Six strikes anti-piracy program fails

We all watch movies, and some of us sometimes watches movies, that they find online on torrenting or streaming sites. Even youtube is full of pirated content. The ordinary, home torrent users are getting a big relief now: the MPAA and RIAA who did a great effort based on the “six strikes” initiative to scare people out of pirating TV shows, movies, and music, are ending it, because the initiative didn’t work. It was first named as The Copyright Alert System was started in 2013 as a partnership between copyright holders and internet providers. It was intended to scare people out of pirating by sending warning notices whenever they were caught. Every warning waas also called a “strike”, and with every strike, their penalties increased. At the end their internet speed got temporarily slowed down.

MPAA general counsel Steven Fabrizio says: “a significant number of users who received alerts stopped engaging in piracy. But the system did nothing to address a persistent group of hardcore, repeat infringers, who were unlikely to change their behavior after receiving these warnings.” The users called the system’s bluff, nothing actually happened after they received six strikes. Internet connection wasn’t turned off, and so people just kept pirating. In 2015, The Internet Security Task Force (representing smaller film producers) released a report stating that the system is “a sham.” No new initiative or penalty-system of any kind were announced to replace the Copyright Alert System for now, at least.

VIA: TheVerge

About Viktor Justin (42 Articles)

journalist, writer

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